Turks and Caicos Island: The Best Things to See and Do - AmazingPlaces.com

Turks and Caicos Islands

An archipelago of more than 300 islands in the Caribbean

The Turks and Caicos Islands are not among the most famous islands of the Caribbean. That is precisely why traveling here is a good idea. The islands are still strikingly green.

The Turks and Caicos Islands group of islands is located north of the island of Hispaniola and southeast of the Bahamas. It is an overseas territory of the United Kingdom. The islands consist largely of limestone. There are many mangrove forests, while the underwater world is very rich.

This archipelago most resembles a long string of islands. You can divide them into two parts. The Turkish Islands lie to the southeast with the main island of Grand Turk and Salt Cay. In the northwest are the Caicos Islands with the main islands: South Caicos, East Caicos, Middle Caicos, North Caicos, Providenciales and West Caicos. East Caicos and West Caicos are uninhabited.

Things to see in Turks and Caicos Islands

Swim with stingrays

A stingray in the Turks and Caicos Islands.

The biggest attraction is Gibbs Cay near Grant Turk. This is a snorkeling and diving spot where you can meet stingrays. The animals are remarkably tame and can be viewed well. You can also encounter friendly nurse sharks.

Ripsaw Music

Anyone traveling to the islands soon becomes acquainted with "Ripsaw Music", a music genre that originated on the islands. The basis of this music is a handsaw that is scraped over with a knife. You come across this in countless places on the islands. And it sounds exotic, so it fits perfectly.

History of the Turks and Caicos Islands

The islands have a turbulent history. According to the history books, the first European to set foot here was the Spanish "conqueror" Juan Ponce de León in 1512. After the discovery, all the Taíno (the original inhabitants) were taken from the islands by slave traders.

The now depopulated islands were used as a base for pirates in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Incidentally, little can be found. The islands were once part of the colony of Jamaica until it became independent.

More information: turksandcaicostourism.com